Monday, August 20, 2012

2012 Yellow Mountain Mao Feng



A tea friend and Korean tea drinker recently commented that there is no beating the depth and variety of Chinese green tea. He went on to say that even though he has tried many types of Chinese green tea there was still so many that he has not tried. A recent post by Gingko on her Life In Teacup blog reiterated this fact when she showed a map of all the types of green tea produced just in Hubei Province- over 20!

The tea that one will review today was sourced by a Korean teamaster who goes to Yellow Mountain each year. It was kindly gifted in an order from Good Green Tea a few months back.



The very wild leaves are convincingly all hand produced. They give off a very sweet, strong, juicy and fresh vibrant floral nose.


The first infusion is very light, floral-water taste with very soft sugary floral nose.

The second is pushed harder and gives off very frosty, clean notes with a sugary subtle floral taste. The mouthfeel is light and airy. It leaves a soft oat aftertaste.


The third is very frosty and sugary and presents a very clean pure taste. A soft fuzzy mossy aftertaste is left stimulating the mouth.

The fourth and fifth infusions have even more floral notes which are pushed out of the crisp sugary-lemonade-like tastes that stretches long into the aftertaste. The qi is profoundly relaxing and slows the mind down while sharpening the senses.


The sixth infusion gives us sweet florals and lingering, fresh subtle melon tastes that stretch. The seventh infusion has turned even more watery.

Peace

4 comments:

Joseph said...

The long leaves look appetizing. I'm used to green tea made from tips.

The Korean Tea Master in Seoul once told me that even the best Korean green tea is only a C compared with an A Chinese green tea. That said, there's something about a nicely roasted Jirisan green tea that endears me!

Matt said...

Joseph,

You won't hear that from many Koreans for sure! Don't think one has ever heard that one before. Some Koreans believe that Chinese puerh tea is the greatest of all tea but few will dare to compare green teas. Are you sure he wasn't Chinese in disguise? Hahaha

Peace

Joseph said...

Haha, Well, he spent 12 years in Taiwan studying to be a Master Calligrapher and ended up becoming a tea Master as well... with all the Chinese tea he's drunk, a good percent of his physical being must be composed of it!

When I told him that I preferred their organic Jirisan tea to the Chinese green tea I've had, he just smiled.

Matt said...

Joseph,

"with all the Chinese tea he's drunk, a good percent of his physical being must be composed of it!"

Or at least he has a very strong vested interest at pushing Chinese tea... sigh... oh typical "tea master" stuff... hahaha

Or at the very least he has developed a taste for Chinese tea and hopes to educate Korean tea drinkers...

Probably at least some of the above factors are influencing his taste buds.

Peace